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‘Visitors’ – The new film from Godfrey Reggio, Philip Glass, and Jon Kane

There simply are no words. And I mean that literally, as you’re about to see.

When I learned recently of the imminent release of a new film by director Godfrey Reggio, he of Koyaanisqatsi, Powaqqatsi, and Naqoyqatsi fame, I was fairly stunned. Then the sensation was augmented when I watched the trailers. As I explained here three months ago, Koyaanisqatsi literally changed my life, and more than one person contacted me after I published that post to let me know they feel the very same way.

And now comes Visitors. Like Reggio’s first three films, this one features an original musical score by Philip Glass. Like Naqoyqatsi, it features visual design by filmmaker Jon Kane. It will premier at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 8, and will be presented there by Steven Soderbergh.

Here is the just-released teaser trailer, followed by an earlier trailer (from 2011) that was released when the project was being developed under the alternate title The Holy See. Even though they’re similar, be sure to watch the second one to its conclusion, which offers a striking “payoff.”

Here’s the film’s official description:

Thirty years after Koyaanisqatsi, Godfrey Reggio — with the support of Philip Glass and Jon Kane — once again leapfrogs over earthbound filmmakers and creates another stunning, wordless portrait of modern life. Presented by Steven Soderbergh in stunning B&W 4K, Visitors reveals humanity’s trancelike relationship with technology, which, when commandeered by extreme emotional states, produces massive effects far beyond the human species. The film is visceral, offering the audience an experience beyond information about the moment in which we live. Comprised of only 74 shots, Visitors takes viewers on a journey to the moon and back to confront them with themselves.

For what it’s worth, I predict a positively mythic impact.

To escape into twilight realms

(The above music was retitled “Escape” when used in the soundtrack for the film The Hours.)

“They had chained him down to things that are, and had then explained the workings of those things till mystery had gone out of the world. When he complained, and longed to escape into twilight realms where magic moulded all the little vivid fragments and prized associations of his mind into vistas of breathless expectancy and unquenchable delight, they turned him instead toward the new-found prodigies of science, bidding him find wonder in the atom’s vortex and mystery in the sky’s dimensions. And when he had failed to find these boons in things whose laws are known and measurable, they told him he lacked imagination, and was immature because he preferred dream-illusions to the illusions of our physical creation.

… “There is talk of apportioning Randolph Carter’s estate among his heirs, but I shall stand firmly against this course because I do not believe he is dead. There are twists of time and space, of vision and reality, which only a dreamer can divine; and from what I know of Carter I think he has merely found a way to traverse these mazes. Whether or not he will ever come back, I cannot say. He wanted the lands of dream he had lost, and yearned for the days of his childhood. Then he found a key, and I somehow believe he was able to use it to strange advantage.

“I shall ask him when I see him, for I expect to meet him shortly in a certain dream-city we both used to haunt. It is rumoured in Ulthar, beyond the River Skai, that a new king reigns on the opal throne of Ilek-Vad, that fabulous town of turrets atop the hollow cliffs of glass overlooking the twilight sea wherein the bearded and finny Gnorri build their singular labyrinths, and I believe I know how to interpret this rumour. Certainly, I look forward impatiently to the sight of that great silver key, for in its cryptical arabesques there may stand symbolised all the aims and mysteries of a blindly impersonal cosmos.”

— H. P. Lovecraft, “The Silver Key